Author dmiyakawa
Recipients dmiyakawa, docs@python
Date 2017-09-24.07:31:29
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Message-id <1506238290.29.0.485453330645.issue31567@psf.upfronthosting.co.za>
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I can see inconsistency in library documentation around functions that are suitable for decorators. I'd like to clarify if it is based on my misunderstanding, or a real documentation problem.

Examples:

- https://docs.python.org/3/library/functions.html#staticmethod
- https://docs.python.org/3/library/functools.html#functools.lru_cache

Both staticmethod() and functools.lru_cache() are used with decorator expressions, while they have slightly different explanations.

The first one looks like just a usual function while the detailed explanations say it is used with decorator expression. The second one is what I don't understand; it says "@functools.lru_cache()", where the function name is "decorated" with @ in the doc. What does @ mean here? If there's some meaning, the next question is, why doc for staticmethod() 
 (and classmethod() in the same page) does not have it?

I don't know which is better, but I believe consistency is good. Some other examples :

- https://docs.python.org/3/library/contextlib.html?highlight=decorator  -> @ here
- https://docs.python.org/3/library/unittest.mock.html#unittest.mock.patch -> no @ here
- https://docs.python.org/2.7/library/functools.html#functools.lru_cache -> Old functools does not have @
History
Date User Action Args
2017-09-24 07:31:30dmiyakawasetrecipients: + dmiyakawa, docs@python
2017-09-24 07:31:30dmiyakawasetmessageid: <1506238290.29.0.485453330645.issue31567@psf.upfronthosting.co.za>
2017-09-24 07:31:30dmiyakawalinkissue31567 messages
2017-09-24 07:31:29dmiyakawacreate