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Author ronaldoussoren
Recipients gjb1002, ronaldoussoren, tebeka
Date 2009-11-27.07:23:00
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Message-id <89B90235-CDA6-47A1-BB51-4CBF82880C9A@mac.com>
In-reply-to <1259260065.63.0.98141409806.issue4057@psf.upfronthosting.co.za>
Content
On 26 Nov, 2009, at 19:27, Geoffrey Bache wrote:

> 
> Geoffrey Bache <gjb1002@users.sourceforge.net> added the comment:
> 
> I can see your point, though I think particularly in this case it's
> (unfortunately) fairly common that scripts on POSIX platforms read $PWD
> instead of finding the current working directory properly. 
> 
> I'm probably not the first person that has had to set PWD explicitly in
> a python program for this reason. Yes, it's really the fault of the
> people who maintain the script I'm calling, but I don't think setting
> PWD on POSIX could have any bad effects and should surely be easy to do?

Shouldn't the script set $PWD itself? AFAIK shells like bash will set $PWD regardless of whether they are running as an interactive shell or as a shellscript.

Reading os.environ['PWD'] in a Python script not a good example of whey the proposed functionality might be useful because there are a number of ways to change the current working directory without affecting os.environ. For example using os.chdir, or even an extensions that calls the chdir system call directly.

Ronald
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Date User Action Args
2009-11-27 07:23:04ronaldoussorensetrecipients: + ronaldoussoren, tebeka, gjb1002
2009-11-27 07:23:02ronaldoussorenlinkissue4057 messages
2009-11-27 07:23:01ronaldoussorencreate